Bali bullet holes

Bali, the long time holiday destination of choice for many Australians, is now being considered as public enemy number one by the same number.

It’s been well documented, so I don’t want to run through the details but it is situations like this that urged me to begin to write here.

Over a decade ago 9 young Australians unsuccessfully attempted to smuggle drugs into Indonesia. They knew the penalty and this morning, 2 of them received the maximum.

Andrew Chan  and Myuran Sukumaran now have Bali bullet holes in their chest.

Their lives lost, their families crushed and  international politics are mess. Despite this damage, I find the largest holes in my own community. It’s displayed ‘proudly’ on social media and justified by archaic law. “They knew the consequences” they say.

They did and more do now but at what cost is such a lack of compassion to our community?

Prison should never be about punishment but reform. If we are drawn into a heartless ‘do the crime pay the time’ system we are no better than the long lost operators of POW camps. And we know the horror they bring.

Yes, you may have guessed, #istandformercy but more steadfast, I stand for love. Let’s not be drawn into spiteful arguments but discuss the problem at it’s roots instead of face value.

Let’s find sense is the senseless together.

Life, and a prison system, without compassion is one of prejudice, hate and fear. Is this community?

All laid out

The warm sun kisses his bare skin, it infiltrates past his outer layers and warms his soul. Laid flat on his back, he seems totally relaxed. His eyes are closed, his feet are bare.

In his own mind he could be anywhere…but he wasn’t, he was laid out on the street. Filthy and alone.

Laid out on his back, his shirt has risen up above his stomach exposing his skin to the sunlight. Unfortunately, the sunlight is the only positive in this image.

His skin is marked with baked dirt and where it isn’t it’s covered with scars. The souls of his feet black as the night and most likely tougher than steel.

I say “most likely” because I didn’t get close enough to tell. I was just another passer by.

I saw but made  no attempt to help. I cannot justify my actions no matter how much time I had left on my lunch break, regardless what meetings I had booked.

I failed. I failed to fulfil my responsibility as a human. 

That could be me. Laying on the ground, hundreds passing me by. His eyes were shut but I bet he could hear every footstep that passed, and didn’t stop.

“Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute.” Proverbs 31:8 

It doesn’t make up for my failure but at least I have spoken. Consider those unfortunate on the street as human, worthy of your compassion. Do not disregard them as simply part of the urban scene.

SENSE